Circulating Ideas – Episode 36: Michael Stephens and Michael Casey

“Steve speaks with Michael Stephens and Michael Casey, writers of the late, lamented ‘Transparent Library’ column for Library Journal.” Circulating Ideas Episode 36.

Charles Pace Named New Director at Gwinnett

Charles Pace was named Executive Director of the Gwinnett County Public Library. Dick Goodman, chair of the Gwinnett County Public Library Board of Trustees, made the announcement as the sole order of business at tonight’s Board Meeting.

Pace, a 2006 Library Journal Mover & Shaker, was most recently the director of the St. Louis County Library. Before that, he was director at the Fargo Public Library.

EDIT Text of Gwinnett’s press release:

GWINNETT COUNTY LIBRARY BOARD APPOINTS

NEW EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

(Lawrenceville, Ga., Dec. 13, 2013) – Charles Pace of St. Louis, Mo., has been appointed executive director of the Gwinnett County Public Library by the library board of trustees at a special called meeting on Friday, December 13.

Pace has been executive director of the 20-branch St. Louis County library system since 2006. He has also directed the Fargo, N.D., library system and managed branch libraries in Houston and Chicago. He holds a master’s degree in library science from the University of North Texas. Library Journal named him a “Mover and Shaker” in 2006.

In St. Louis, he maintained budget surpluses throughout the recession, led a successful campaign to fund capital improvements, increased circulation and library use, and partnered with more than 100 community groups to help support the library system, which was named a “Top Workplace in St Louis” by the St. Louis Post Dispatch.

“The board and staff are excited that Charles Pace will lead the Gwinnett County public library system,” said Dick Goodman, chairman of the library board. “Coming from a library that is slightly larger than ours, serving a population similar in size to that of Gwinnett, he has the level and kind of financial, operational and managerial experience the board feels is necessary to effectively manage our own dynamic library system.”

He pointed to Pace’s record of building community partnerships as one of the reasons the board selected him for the job. “We look forward to working with Charles to create stronger connections between the library and its patrons in the numerous and diverse communities the library serves and to guide the Gwinnett County public library to become a showcase of the 21st century library,” said Goodman.

Gwinnett’s library system receives county and state funding as well as self-generated funds. In addition, since 2001, SPLOST sales tax programs have provided more than $20 million for new branch construction, renovations, upgrades and relocations. The library’s trustees are appointed by county commissioners.

The system owns more than a million books, magazines, e-books and media items and provides public access to 250 online databases at each of its 15 branches. Last year, almost 290,000 cardholders checked out 6.7 million items with 21 percent handled by self-service. Staff answered more than 81,000 questions to the AskGCPL phone and email service and 4,880 volunteers donated 37,000 hours of service.

More information about the Gwinnett County library system is available at www.gwinnettpl.org.

Writing on the Wall: Social Media, the First 2,000 Years

Writing on the Wall Cover ArtTom Standage is a digital editor at The Economist and author of the new book “Writing On The Wall: Social Media, The First 2,000 Years”.

Video: Economist, author interview.

Review: New York Times book review.

 

Leo Laporte interviews the author on Triangulation:

The Hyperlinked Library MOOC: Participatory Service

I had the privilege of speaking with Michael Stephens for his upcoming Fall 2013 Hyperlinked Library MOOC at the San Jose State University, School of Library and Information Science. The topic of our conversation was participatory library service, community engagement, the use of teams, and a few other interesting issues.

Computers, the 1980s, and Computer Chronicles

Shortly after I got my first computer in 1982 — a Commodore VIC-20 — I started looking for information regarding games, programming, computer hardware, etc. One of my first dependable sources for information came in 1983 when I began watching a new PBS television show called Computer Chronicles, hosted by Stewart Cheifet.

This week, Cheifet is interviewed on Leo Laporte’s Triangulation. It’s a good interview, with lots of discussion about the early days of personal computer technology. And, if you’re interested in viewing any of the old episodes of Computer Chronicles, you can find them all at the Internet Archive.